C Vitamin divider

Scurvy was observed long before the discovery of vitamin C; during long sea voyages, it was common for more than half of the sailors to be lost at the end of the journey. Symptoms of scurvy included inflamed, bleeding gums, various joint and skin problems, fatigue, and a general feeling of malaise. Fortunately for the sailors, a Scottish doctor named James Lind observed that scurvy could be prevented and cured with various citrus fruits, such as oranges or lemons. Due to difficulties arising from shelf life, sauerkraut was also used on longer trips, which - as it turned out at the time - could also prevent the disease.

Plant sources

Acerola cherry 1675 mg / 100 g
Rosehips 426 mg / 100 g
Guava fruit 228.3 mg / 100 g
Bell Pepper (Yellow) 204 mg / 100 g
Black currant 181 mg / 100 g
Chili 143,7 mg / 100 g
Bell Pepper (Red) 127.7 mg / 100 g
Jalapeno pepper 118.6 mg / 100 g
Green pepper 109 mg / 100 g
Kale 93.4 mg / 100 g
Pepper 92.9 mg / 100 g
Kiwi 92.7 mg / 100 g
Broccoli 89.2 mg / 100 g
Brussels sprouts 85 mg / 100 g
Pommelo 61 mg / 100 g
Green pea 60 mg / 100 g
Papaya 60.9 mg / 100 g
Strawberry 58.8 mg / 100 g
Red cabbage 57 mg / 100 g
Orange 53,2 mg / 100 g
Lemon 53 mg / 100 g
Cauliflower 48.2 mg / 100 g
Pineapple 47.8 mg / 100 g
Red currant 41 mg / 100 g
Chestnut 40.2 mg / 100 g
Cabbage 36,6 mg / 100 g
Mango 36,4 mg / 100 g
Elderberry 36 mg / 100 g
Grapefruit 34,4 mg / 100 g
Garlic 31,2 mg / 100 g
Lime 29,1 mg / 100 g
Spinach 28,1 mg / 100 g
Gooseberry 27.7 mg / 100 g
Mandarin 26,7 mg / 100 g
Raspberry 26,2 mg / 100 g
Tomato 23 mg / 100 g
Pumpkin 21 mg / 100 g
Blackberry 21 mg / 100 g
Melon 18 mg / 100 g
Zucchini 17.9 mg / 100 g
Radish 14.8 mg / 100 g
Cranberry 14 mg / 100 g
Sour cabbage 14.7 mg / 100 g
Pomegranate 10.2 mg / 100 g
Apricot 10 mg / 100 g
Avocado 10 mg / 100 g
Plum 9.7 mg / 100 g
Blueberry 9.7 mg / 100 g
Banana 8.7 mg / 100 g
Watermelon 8.1 mg / 100 g

Animal sources

Sheep liver 13 mg / 100 g

Vitamin C is one of the most important antioxidants in our body. Our natural antioxidant system — of which vitamin C is an essential part — helps reduce oxidative stress caused by free radicals, environmental toxins, and infections. Increased oxidative stress and associated inflammatory processes can lead to the development of several chronic diseases.

Vitamin C is necessary for collagen production, thus contributing to healthy skin and joints and improving regeneration from injuries.

Infections can significantly increase our need for vitamin C; in the absence of it, the activity of immune cells decreases, and the risk of infections increases.